How do you use possession in English?

The possessive form is used with nouns referring to people, groups of people, countries, and animals. It shows a relationship of belonging between one thing and another. To form the possessive, add apostrophe + s to the noun. If the noun is plural, or already ends in s, just add an apostrophe after the s.

A noun names a person, place, thing, idea, quality or action. A possessive noun shows ownership by adding an apostrophe, an “s” or both. To make a single noun possessive, simply add an apostrophe and an “s.”

Also Know, what are the 3 Uses of apostrophe? The apostrophe has three uses: 1) to form possessive nouns; 2) to show the omission of letters; and 3) to indicate plurals of letters, numbers, and symbols.

Keeping this in consideration, how do you show possession with a name?

Rule: To show singular possession of a name ending in s or z, some writers add just an apostrophe. Others also add another s. See Rules 1b and 1c of Apostrophes for more discussion. Rule: To show plural possession of a name ending in s, ch, or z, form the plural first; then immediately use the apostrophe.

What is correct James or James’s?

Commentary: both James‘ birthday and James’s birthday are grammatically correct. Remember: it’s up to you! Use the version which best matches how you would pronounce it. Use James’s if you pronounce it “Jamesiz”, but use James‘ if you pronounce it “James“.

Is it Chris or Chris’s?

In other style guides, Chris takes an apostrophe and an s: Chris’s. “AP” rules that proper names such as Chris, Agnes, and Russ take only an apostrophe, like these examples: Chris’ photograph appears on page 1 of the business section. (Other style guides use Chris’s.)

Is possession a noun or verb?

noun. the act or fact of possessing. the state of being possessed. ownership.

How do you show possession?

Apostrophe Rules for Possessives Use an apostrophe + S (‘s) to show that one person/thing owns or is a member of something. Use an apostrophe after the “s” at the end of a plural noun to show possession. If a plural noun doesn’t end in “s,” add an apostrophe + “s” to create the possessive form.

What does it mean to take possession?

take possession (of something) To gain or assume ownership or custody of something. She took possession of the house following the court’s ruling that she was the legal inheritor of the estate.

What is possession in a sentence?

Examples of possession in a Sentence The city can take possession of the abandoned buildings. She came into possession of a rare silver coin. The family lost all of its possessions in the fire. This ring was my mother’s most precious possession. The defendant was charged with heroin possession.

Is it Jones or Jones’s?

The plural of Jones is obviously not Jones or Jones’, it’s Joneses. All the English style guides insist that singular possessives are formed with -‘s and plurals with only -‘, so the possessive of Jones (singular) is Jones’s and the possessive of Joneses is Joneses’.

What is the root word of possession?

mid-14c., “act or fact of possessing, a taking possession, occupation,” also “thing possessed, that which is possessed,” from Old French possession “fact of having and holding; what is possessed;” also “demonic possession,” and directly from Latin possessionem (nominative possessio), noun of action from past participle

How do you show possession with a name that ends in s?

Rule: To show singular possession of a name ending in s or z, some writers add just an apostrophe. Others also add another s. See Rules 1b and 1c of Apostrophes for more discussion. Rule: To show plural possession of a name ending in s, ch, or z, form the plural first; then immediately use the apostrophe.

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe Examples Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( O holy night! Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( Welcome, O life!

Do you put an apostrophe after a name?

Using Possessive Apostrophes. Use an apostrophe to indicate ownership by a proper noun. An apostrophe with an “s” after a proper noun indicates that the person, place or thing owns whatever noun follows his or her name. For example, “Mary’s lemons.” We know the lemons belong to Mary because of the ‘s.

How do you show possession in a sentence?

Use the apostrophe to show possession. To show possession with a singular noun, add an apostrophe plus the letter s. Rule 1b. Many common nouns end in the letter s (lens, cactus, bus, etc.).

Where do you put apostrophe after a name ending in s?

In names which end in S the possessive plural is usually formed by simply adding an apostrophe: “the Joneses’ house” It’s most often “in Jesus’ name.” “In Jesus’s name” is acceptable, but those three syllables ending in S next to each other sound awkward.

How do you use commas?

Use a comma before any coordinating conjunction (and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet) that links two independent clauses. Use a comma after a dependent clause that starts a sentence. Use commas to offset appositives from the rest of the sentence. Use commas to separate items in a series.

Do you use an apostrophe when referring to a family name?

To show possession of a whole family: First, add -es or -s to write the family’s last name in plural form. Then, add an apostrophe at the end to show possession. Right: Pip belongs to the Joneses.